Heritage 23 Rowing Program
Promoting Community Boat Building,
Rowing &
Sailing on the Heritage
Coast of Michigan
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David Wentworth or

Leo Chartier
989 460-2642

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2016-17 Rowing Program

Membership and Waiver Required to participate.

We are forming women and men rowing teams to learn how to use the Heritage 23 boats when setup in the rowing configuration.  We are in the Tawas area this summer and fall recruiting participants.  Our 2016 goal will be form 4 men and 4 women teams (5 persons on each team).  We are also forming 3 person teams to row the Penobscot 14. We are looking for a "steering" person (coxswain) and 4 rowers (aka the hard working "rowing" crew) for each team.  Rowing engages your core, abdominal, lower back, tones your legs and sculpts your upper body.  What a great way to learn a new skill, get some exercise and participate in local events!  Alpena and Tawas Heritage 23 racing off the State Dock are show in the picture below.  The Heritage 23 teams may also participate with the Penobscot 14 foot boat when only 3 team members (coxswain and 2 hard working rowers) are available.

We are recruiting 20 women and 20 men to form additional teams.  Look for us at various locations in the Tawas area..  Check about our uo coming Regattas competitions to be held in the summer of 2017.  There is plenty of time to get your team ready.  You can also learn to sail the Heritage 23. Meet new people, learn new skills, and enjoy the Heritage 23 member picnics.  Only $1 for a day membership (limit of 3) or $25 for a 2016 membership.  Please contact us for details at 989 460-2642.

We are located in slip 102 at the East Tawas State dock and are available for rowers from 5:00 am to 7:00 pm six days a week. (Wednesday is maintenance day). The Heritage 23 requires a crew of 5 and the Penobscot 14 can accommodate a crew of 1, 2 or 3.  See the full details below the picture.

Women's maiden rowing day

 

Get out on the water rowing for fun and fitness.

HERITAGE 23 Boat

Open Rows for Individuals

A coxswain is provided at the times listed below to allow individual members that are not part of a team the opportunity to row. Crews may vary from day to day. Coxswains will fill their boat on a first come first serve basis each week. Click on the schedule form below to email HCS&R to reserve a seat for the open row period you want. This must be done by Friday at noon each week for the next week.

Day of week    Time                               Click to Schedule

Monday             6:00 pm to 7:00 pm       Scheduler
Tuesday            6:00 pm to 7:00 pm       Scheduler
Wednesday                                             Maintenance Day
Thursday           6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
      Scheduler
Friday                6:00 pm to 7:00 pm       Scheduler
Saturday            8:00 am to 9:00 am        Scheduler
Sunday              9:00 am to 10:00 am      Scheduler

Times will be added as coxswains become available and as rowers request.

Teams

Teams are composed of members who like to row at regularly scheduled times. Teams choose their own crew members, coxswain and scheduled times. Team member qualifications must bereviewed and accepted by Heritage Coast Sailing and Rowing. If you wish to form a team, contact Dave Wentworth with team make up.

Team                           Days                      Time                                      Captain

Third Coasters            M T T F S               10:00 am to 11:00 am        Wentworth

If you wish to join an existing Heritage 23 team, contact the team captain. Captains must reserve their days and times by contacting the scheduler. A second Heritage-23 is under
construction and will be put into service in 2014.

Penobscot 14 Boat

HCS&R 2016 Rowing Program

The Penobscot 14 is a two place rowing boat, and can be rowed with or without a coxswain.  Contact the Scheduler to set up times. Times available for use are 5:00 am to 6:00 pm in time periods not to exceed 1 hour 30 minutes. P-14 rower’s qualifications must be approved by HCS&R prior to use. The P-14 is reserved as an individual rower boat during the times shown above.

Rowing Instructor

We are searching for a rowing instructor to provide instruction and coaching for rowers. We are all novices as rowers.  Employment will depend upon two factors, our ability to find someone who is qualified and the financial results of the Heritage Coast Offshore Grand Prix, our primary fund raiser. The Basic Rowing write-up is designed to assist you in getting started.

Rowing Basics

Knowledge to provide a basis for safe and fun rowing. Have fun, be safe.

Safety is key. Coxswains are responsible for safety and instructions to rowers. They should have knowledge and training in boat safety, boat handling, emergency procedures, rules of the road, and weather.

Focus is important. Rowers should pay attention to coxswain for instructions.

Personal Flotation Devices (PDF): Rowers under 18 must wear PDF at all times on board.

Winter rowers must wear PFDs when on board. ( 10/1 to 6/1). Manually inflated PDFs (nonautomatic) are not accepted by HCS&R as a qualified PDF.

Terms: Alphabetical Listing. Please refer to diagrams on the next pages.

Blade: The flat part of a oar, the part that goes into the water to provide power.

Bow: Forward edge, front of the boat (forward).

Bow oar: Rower most forward on boat.

Button: The part of an oar, at the top of the leather, that keeps the oar from sliding out of the oarlock.

Catch: The portion of a rowing stroke where the oar enters the water from the “ready-allposition”.

(See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke)

Coxswain: Individual responsible for the boat, for safety, for instructing rowers and steering boat.

Dock lines: Ropes used to secure the boat to a dock.

Drive: The portion of a rowing stroke from the catch position, where the rower leans back and pulls the blade back, straight through the water. Pull first with the back, then with the arms at the end of the stroke. After a few strokes, these two motions blend into one. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke) (aka Pull)

Finish: The portion of a rowing stroke where the oar blade is lifted out of water by

Heritage 23 Rowing Basics pushing down on handle. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke)

Grip: The narrower portion of the oar at the end of the oar opposite the blade. The handle is the area where the oar is gripped.

Gunwale: Top edge of the boat, running from bow to stern.

Leathers: The leather clad portion of an oar. The leather shields the oar from wear.

Lines: Ropes

Loom: The shaft of an oar between the blade and the grip.

No. 1 oar: Rower in first thwart from front of boat also known as Bow oar.

No. 2 oar: Rower in second thwart from front of boat.

No. 3 oar: Rower in third thwart from front of boat.

No. 4 oar: Rower in 4th thwart from front of boat, also know as the stroke oar. Stroke oar (stroke rower) is visible to all of the other rowers who synchronize their rowing pace to the stroke rower.

Oarlock: On a Heritage 23, metal fittings that are mounted on the gunwale to support the oars while rowing

Port: Left side of the boat when facing forward.

Pull: The portion of a rowing stroke from the catch position, where the rower leans back and pulls the blade back, straight through the water. Pull first with the back, then with the arms at the end of the Stroke. After a few strokes, these two motions blend into one. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke) Also know as “drive”.

Pulling boat: The Heritage 23 is a pulling boat, it has four rowers and four oars. Each rower has only one oar.

Push: The portion of a rowing stroke for backing-up the boat where the rower pushes the blade through water. Opposite of drive or pull part of rowing stroke. Used to back up boat. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke)

Ready-All-Position: The beginning position of the rowing stroke that the rower assumes when preparing to start a rowing stroke. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke)

Return: The portion of a rowing stroke where the rower returns the oar to the ready-all position. (See text below, in section labeled Rowing Stroke)

Starboard: Right side of the boat when facing forward

Stern: Back of the boat. (Aft)

Stroke oar: Rower in 4th thwart from front of boat, also know as the stroke oar. Stroke oar sets rowing pace for other rowers. See No. 4 oar above.

Thwart: a seat.

Getting on Board

The coxswain (cox) directs rowers to enter and leave the boat. Usually, the oars will already be on board in the “ship oars” position (two oars on each side, on the thwarts, handles toward the bow. Generally, the Cox will board first, then board the bow rower (aka #1), then the stern rower (aka stroke or #4), then #2 and finally #4.

Rowers should

C enter or leave the boat one at a time

C announce “coming aboard” when entering the boat

C announce “going ashore” when leaving the boat

C keep their weight as low as possible while moving in, out and on the boat

C position themselves to balance the boat

Rowing Stroke

Pulling the boat forward

Ready-All Position: Rowers position themselves in preparation to start a stroke. Leaning forward (toward the stern) with their arms fully extended with the oar blade above the water.

Catch and Pull: Catch: by raising the oar’s handle, the rower drops the oar blade into the water and begin the pull portion. Pull: the rower leans back pulling the blade through the water, then adds the power of the arms toward the end of the pull phase. (“Pull” is also known as “Drive”)

Finish and Return: Finish: the rower raises the blade from the water by pushing down on the handle. Return: Oar is returned to the “Ready All” position first with the arms followed by the body leaning toward the stern. The arms and then body motion tends to allow the boat to glide forward more smoothly.  A rectangular motion is preferable to an oval motion. The blade should travel just below the surface of the water on the pull portion and just above it on the return portion. Raising the bladetoo high on the return is called “skying” and dipping the blade too low in the water is called “digging”.

Pushing the boat backward:

Ready-All Position: Rowers position themselves in preparation to start a pushing stroke by leaning bach with their hands at the lower chest and the oar blade above the water.

Catch and Push: Catch: by raising the oar’s handle, the rower drops the oar blade into the water and begin the push portion. Push: the rower leans forward pushing the blade through the water, then extends the arms.

Finish and Return: Finish: the rower raises the blade from the water by pushing down on the handle. Return: Oar is returned to the “Ready All” position first with the arms followed by the body leaning toward the bow.

Rowing Commands

“Ready All” Rowers lean forward to be ready to begin rowing.

“Pull Together” All rowers start rowing. Repeating the catch- pull-finish-return rowing stroke until another command is given. The #4 rower, the “stroke oar” sets the rate of rowing, the stroke.

“Push Together” All rowers start pushing together. Repeating the catch- pull-finish-return rowing stroke until another command is given. The #4 rower, the “stroke oar” sets the rate of rowing, the stroke.

“Weigh Enough” All rowers stop rowing, bring oars perpendicular to side of boat, feathered and level with the water. Some traditional boat clubs use the term “avast”.

“Hold Water” Oar blades are placed in the water to slow and/or stop boat.

“Shorten Oars” Rowers pull oars in while rowing so that boat can pass through a narrow spot.

“Rest Oars” Rowers pull oars in across both gunwales and rest.

“Out Oars” Each rower puts his/her oar in the oarlock in the “hold water” position.

“Trail Oars” Oar blades are positioned along side the aft portion of the boat and above the gunwales. Used to pass through a narrow space and as a preliminary command to “ship oars”.

“Drop Oars” Blades are dropped into the water, feathered (turning the oar blade flat, to slow the boat parallel to water). May be given prior to “Hold Water” command.

“Ship Oars” Oars are put in the boat from the “Trail Oars” position. Handles toward bow along the gunwales.

“Square Blades” Oar blades are turned so that they are perpendicular to the water.

Row Safely and Have Fun!

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